Biya Imposes CPDM Tax On State Officials

 

 

State officials will now start paying a toll to the ruling CPDM party following an order signed by President Biya. Biya, the CPDM Chair, issued the order on June 25, fixing the rate of special monthly financial contributions that State officials within the various rungs of the administration must make to the party. According to the decision No.6/RDPC/PN/ of June 25, 2012, such contributions are absolutely necessary for the better functioning of the party.

The decision provides that those who fall in Category A of militants like the President of the Senate, the Speaker of the National Assembly, the Prime Minister and the President of the Economic and Social Council pay a monthly contribution of FCFA 100.000 each. State functionaries in Category B like members of Government, Governors, Rectors of State universities, Special Advisers at the Presidency and the Prime Minister’s Office, Government Delegates to City Councils, Ambassadors, Vice Presidents of the Senate, Deputy Speakers of the National Assembly, General Managers of public and para-public enterprises and Presidents of the Consular Chambers will pay FCFA 60.000 each, monthly.

In the same vein, Members of the Bureau of the Senate and the National Assembly, Deputy General Managers of State corporations, Board Chairpersons of public and para-public corporations, Secretaries General in the Ministries and other officials ranked as Inspectors General and Directors General, will pay FCFA 50.000 monthly.

The same financial obligation holds sway for Technical Advisers at the Presidency, the Senate, the National Assembly, the Prime Minister’s Office and the Economic and Social Council.
The decision of the CPDM Chair equally imposes a monthly contribution of FCFA 40.000 on substantive members of the CPDM Central Committee, Members of the National Assembly, Technical Advisers of the Economic and Social Council, Directors and Chiefs of Central Services in ministries and Mayors.

Alternate members of the CPDM Central Committee, Directors and Departmental Chiefs of public and para-public establishments and members of Consular Chambers will contribute FCFA 30.000 each. According to article 2 of the decision, in case a person holds cumulative functions he or she should consider the highest function in making the financial contribution to the party. Going by the decision, every other decision that obtained before on contributions to the party is now null and void.

Article 4 of the decision calls on the CPDM Secretary General and the National Treasurer of the party to ensure strict execution of its provisions. A source from the party’s Central Committee told The Post that what obtained prior to the National Chair’s June decision, was that contributions from party supporters were voluntary except the case of MPs who were compelled to pay FCFA 20.000 monthly to the party.

At one time, the then Treasurer General of the party, Hamajoda Adjoudji, complained that the coffers of the party were empty, yet events organised by the party bubbled with financial effervescence. Managers of State corporations and other well placed officials sponsored the party’s activities with huge sums of State money, consequently creating room for many State officials to embezzle huge sums of public funds in the name of sponsoring the party.

The Post learnt that when Biya launched the anti-corruption onslaught, swearing that those who have embezzled State money and were using the party as a hideout would not be spared, the party started having financial difficulties. The present decision, The Post gathered, is to ward off the financial asphyxia that the party is said to have been suffering from for quite some time.

“By virtue of this order by the National Chairman, it is clear that only State officials who are CPDM supporters have been asked to contribute for the functioning of the party. For instance, Bello Bouba Maigari, is a member of Government from the NUDP party, so he cannot be contributing for the functioning of the CPDM,” a source said.

By Yerima Kini Nsom

The Post